A self drafted skirt…using Winifred Aldrich’s Metric Pattern cutting for Womenswear book.

Hello chums!

Phew I am really trying to catch on all my blog posts before the beginning of September so apologies in advance for the project dump that will be happening in the next week. This is another one of my UFOs that I tackled after getting back in May.

Ok here is a skirt (in progress) that should have been finished over 2 years ago when I started working on it. Believe it or not but I actually started this before even buying the Suzy Furrer Craftsy class. From early on when I read about bloggers who were drafting their own patterns, I was fascinated and keen to try it out so I borrowed the Winifred Aldrich book from the library.

The inspiration for my skirt was this Boden skirt that I just loved but couldn’t afford.2e5c4298c107dd1a7417658f5aca3b79

In terms of the drafting instructions – they were quite easy to follow. The ease on the block was quite considerable and I had to take in about 2 inches in total. I made 3 muslins in total. Once I had a 2 dart tailored skirt draft that seemed to work I then had to make princess line seams which went well and I decided to add pockets as well.

May bank holiday weekend 346
Lowered waist on front side panels.
May bank holiday weekend 347
Playing around with fun topstitching
PicMonkey Image
The 2 dart sloper makes for a nice back fit.
Self drafted skirt
Line wrinkling like mad…
Interiors
The insides – finished by overlocker

I added a contoured waist on either side of the front center panel with the pockets angled straight across. I think it it sort of worked but I took forever with this. This is mock up number 4 I think. I used linen but really I need to use a woolen as my intended final garment is a woolen. The trick with the wool will be dealing with the bulk – there are places where there will be 4 layers of fabric intersecting. Thought with linen its manageable – I will need to think about this. Its supposed to be lined but hey Done is better than perfect right? I simply finished the waist with a petersham ribbon. (my woolen one will be lined. I did draft the facing and lining pattern pieces. I found the length perhaps a tad too long and will reduce it by another inch. If I do that I will add the vents which I skipped in this muslin.

Its a workable pattern I think and I am finally going to make it using a pink tweed wool that is part of my preciousness fabric stash 🙂

But that will be sooner rather later :-).

Thanks for stopping by!

Peace and love,

Hila

XOX

PS. This is not a review of the Winifred Aldrich book. I have not made enough from this book yet to justify an opinion on it. I hope in future to make more from this book. So far the main thing I have noticed is the huge amount of ease with the initial draft.

 

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10 thoughts on “A self drafted skirt…using Winifred Aldrich’s Metric Pattern cutting for Womenswear book.

  1. Congrats!! 🙂 I played with sloper drafting around spring, I made 3-4 muslins but never felt it was right, I made bodice slopers. I’m always fascinated by the drafting and draping processes, but I just have no time, no patience for it anymore… it can easily get exhausting!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes it is quite exhausting and requires a good amount of patience. I do find that there are more sewing patterns out there that I can just adjust or tweak to get what I want.

      Like

  2. Winnie is very useful – and it is great to be able to adapt a skirt that fits into many shapes – but I never got on with the trouser block. Once you are confident that all of your blocks fit you can really have some fun!
    Well done on the skirt – it looks great and I know the tweed will be even better.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I have this book too but have not used it yet, instead I learned to draft skirts from a Craftsy class, I want so much to learn also bodice drafting but I just have not managed to do it yet.
    Looking forward to see your tweed version, judging from this it will look amazing, there are all this interesting lines and details which along with your sewing skill give a beautiful result 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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