SWAP2017 The Capsule Wardrobe Saga Pt 2 : The Patterns

saga
ˈsɑːɡə/
noun

2.

a long, involved story, account, or series of incidents.
“launching into the saga of her engagement”

synonyms:

rigmarole, story, lengthy story/statement/explanation;

chain of events, catalogue of disasters;
informalspiel, palaver

d42183a5fbcb8a47def797dcfe7703acOn Sewing With A Plan.

Following on from my last SWAP post, I continue with sharing the patterns I have selected. The rules state that you may only use 8 sewing patterns to make the 11 garments. It was challenging to restrict myself to just 8 but I understand why the SWAP Co-Ordinator did that. This SWAP is about celebrated TNT patterns.

In the end I have selected these patterns – 2 of the items are still undecided and any pointers will be very much appreciated. Here goes

THE UPPERS

THE LOWERSyellow20maxi20skirtpicmonkey20imageemerald

THE OVERSmotomac

THE UNDECIDEDundecided

The last 2 are still undecided. I have used up 7 of my 8 patterns allowance. I have to decide how best to achieve these two. I have to decide which one gets the 8th pattern and which one is a derivative of the aforementioned 7…..

Next SWAP post I will talk about the fabrics I have secured to achieve the closest evocation of  these inspiration images.

Thanks for stopping by.

Peace and love,

Hila

 

Petersham ribbons – an expansion post

My last post on the self-drafted skirt led to this post on petersham. Naomi asked me to expand on petersham ribbon and I said I’d do a post since my reply was getting long.

But first this:

The first time I used ‘petersham’ I had actually been sold grosgrain. Since I had asked the shop assistant who very nicely showed it to me – I just assumed I had the petersham that I had read of. I recall even asking if it would curve and she said yes. As I was sewing, it remained suspiciously straight but I reasoned that maybe it had to be worn before it does its thing. However, after wearing the skirt a couple of times with no change in the shape of the ‘petersham’, I started considering the possibility that it wasn’t me who had made a sewing mistake.

That’s when my search began again – better equipped with the knowledge of what  ‘was definitely not‘ petersham ribbon. I eventually found a haberdashery which was run by an old woman in the market (she told me she had been there for 40 years). She also had some petersham. I was mistrustful given my previous experience but I bought 1m (it looked a lot like grosgrain but had a teeny tiny difference to my untrained eye). When I got home – I unrolled it and immediately noticed the difference between the first one (grosgrain) and this second one. This was definitely Petersham ribbon. I got back as soon as I could to the market to buy more but alas !- apparently she had retired and the day that I had bought the 1m was her last day! So I now had to find some Petersham! The game was on.

Why bother with petersham in the first place

Before I get into a long ramble of petersham ribbon, let me sell you on the benefits of this essential sewing cave notion. The benefits are manifold:

  • It’s so comfortable because it expands to contours of the body and ‘sits’ rather than grips the waist.
  • Can be use if there is no fabric for a facing
  • Can be used to reduce bulk at the waist
  • Its put on after everything is constructed and fitting done so it’s less fuss
  • It’s a strong durable finish used often in couture houses
  • It is much easier to use than a normal waistband.
  • looks neat on the inside

So what is a petersham ribbon?

My first stop was Wikipedia and it says:

Petersham ribbon, also called Petersham facing or simply Petersham, is a thick, stiff, flexible corded ribbon usually made out of eithercotton, rayon, viscose, or a cotton/ rayon or viscose blend of fibers and used as facing by milliners and tailors… It is woven so that once steamed, it will take on and support a particular curve of fabric….t is also useful as an alternative to bias tape for making fabric conform closely to the shape of the body wearing it— in a corset, for example, or along the waistline of a pair of trousers or a skirt.

This is an accurate definition. Petersham looks like a ribbon but it is much thicker and not as drapey as a ribbon. Like grosgrain (pronunced grograin) ribbon, it comes with a scalloped edge but petersham has a tighter weave on one side which allows it to take on and support a curve.20170404_16375320170404_163814

It sounds simple enough but the problem is that in most sewing books that I have read there is no consistency as to what grosgrain and petersham are. In most cases, it is used interchangeably. Add to that the fact that in most shops I have enquired about petersham I almost always get shown grosgrain. It’s not the shop assistant’s fault either as I elaborate below.

Grosgrain or Petersham? Same thing or different?

Petersham is not to be confused with its close cousin grosgrain, which is straight like normal ribbon you might use in hair.

What do the sewing books have to say….

20170404_164119
You cant take the academia out of the girl…..

 

I did a search of my sewing books. I was limited to my own personal library and if there are other books that deal specifically with petersham ribbon I’d love to hear in the comments below.

Just like my shopping experiences, my sewing books also present different information.

Readers Digest mentions petershams and only says this:

Petersham ribbon is often used for finishing or staying waistlines. It can also be a decorative trim. It is sold by the meter in various widths and a wide range of colours. A special curved petersham is also available in black and white only. Pg. 20

This tells me that it is referring to grosgrain in the first then actual petersham last. It is helpful as it does point out that petershams are only in black and white.

The Vogue Sewing Book doesn’t have petersham listed in its index or glossary so I went to look at skirt waistband finishing. Sure enough, it pops up there but under a different guise and name here is the extract (on Faced Waistline):

RIBBON: Shape a 20 -25 mm (3/4″ – 1″) wide strip of grosgrain ribbon by steaming it into curves corresponding to those of the waistline edge. Be sure to stretch the edge that is to be let free; if you shrink the edge to be joined to the garment, it will stretch during wear. Fit ribbon to your body, allowing 25mm (1″) for ends. pg 336

Based on what we already know about the definition of petersham, – clearly, this tutorial is talking about petersham and not grosgrain which will not ever curve unless cut or darted. It’s a good tutorial apart from the fact that if a beginner were to buy grosgrain and follow it, they would be shocked (perhaps not shocked per se but maybe frustrated) to find it’s not working. (Caveat being that they are using this 1978 edition which I have – if anyone has a newer edition – is this still the same exact text or has it been changed? )

20170404_200711
Vogue Sewing Book

 

The Sewing Book (Alison Smith) This book had petersham in the index and has a well illustrated photographic tutorial which refers to petersham ribbon as we know it. Here is the extract:.

Petersham in an alternative finish to a facing if you do not have enough fabric to cut a facing. Available in black and white, it is a stiff, ridged tape that is 2.5cm (1″) wide and curved – the tighter curve is the top edge. Like a facing, petersham is attached to the waist after the skirt or trousers have been constructed. pg 177

This is the best succinct explanation along with the tutorial. On pg 179 there is an equally good entry on grosgrain distinguishing between the two ribbon cousins and providing a tutorial on using grosgrain.  The only thing missing from both these tutorials is how to finish the petersham and grosgrain at the zip fastening. I have provided a link down below in the resources section on a great tutorial which goes all the way to finishing around the zip fastening – I highly recommend this read if you are looking to up your finishing techniques.

20170404_200631
The Sewing Book (Alison Smith)

 

Couture Sewing Techniques (Claire Schaeffer) is the only book to use the term grosgrain and describe a process that is for grosgrain ribbon. I have included it as I found it very interesting. She describes a technique where snipping and darting are used to shape it. So it is definitely grosgrain as it is sold today i.e. straight and needing cutting to shape it to a curve. It doesn’t have a petersham entry on index or glossary either.Here is the extract.

20170404_200528
Couture Sewing Techniques (Claire Schaeffer)

 

Gerstie’s Ultimate Dress Book (Gretchen Hirsch) has a petersham reference in the index. I can’t be too certain but it looks like what’s being referred to is possibly a grosgrain given that it comes in different widths and colours. Also looking at the picture provided, I can’t see the typical waviness I’d expect to see on a petersham that’s been curved around a waist.  Perhaps this might be a US thing and they sell the petersham as defined at the beginning there in differing widths and colours? If there are any US readers who know I’d love to hear your experiances/thoughts on this.

Here is the extract:20170404_200836

20170404_200256
Characteristic waviness of a petersham ribbon

 

So far the Alison Smith book has provided the clearest definitions and tutorial for petersham ribbon. It’s the one book where a beginner would seek to find the proper petersham ribbon since the book specifically says that its only black and white and 1″ wide. The tutorial would also yield a good result as everything matches up.

Ok so now we know that petersham ribbon is the best thing since sliced bread and why there is some confusion as to what it actually is. But hopefully, by now, you get the idea that grosgrain is NOT petersham. Perhaps you can even tell the difference between them. Of course, now are wondering where to buy this lovely thing I speak of. Well, that’s a tricky one……

Where to buy  petersham ribbon?

I live in the UK so my experiance is limited to this country unfortunately.  More specifically to my region in Yorkshire. I tried buying on Ebay twice and each time received grosgrain so I gave up buying online. I went to Bonds in Farsley but they didn’t have any in stock at that time (I havent yet returned to check but they said they stock it). I found some in Boyes Super Store (Bradford branch) where I bought loads. Samuel Taylors in Leeds Market also had some. And thats it. I have basically stocked up and have about 10m each of the black and white in my cave. I invite readers from other countries (& UK) to share if they know where to buy petersham. Please let me know in the comments below.

Mistakes to avoid.

Hopefully, I made these mistakes so you don’t have to.

Buying the wrong thing.

  • Watch out for descriptions that say grosgrain/petersham in them – most likely they are the grosgrain ribbon. As mentioned above, my research indicates that petersham and grosgrain are 2 separate things.
  • I have also yet to ever come across Petersham that isn’t black or white or 1″ wide. I use that as an indicator myself. Buy from reputable sellers so that you can double check with them before buying. Also once you find it, buy shed loads of it – it’s not easy to come by!

Cutting your petersham too short.

Its painful and it has happened to me but I quickly learnt not to do that again. Now I don’t necessarily cut it from my roll before sewing in on. I will sew it on then cut off the excess leaving the allowance I need to turn under.

Unraveling ends

I have used Fray check successfully especially when I cut it an angle which I wouldn’t advise. Otherwise turn it under and hand sew it as soon as possible.

Petersham ribbon when used correctly creates the most comfortable waist finish. My all time favourite Holyburn skirt has a Petersham ribbon.

20170404_200400_HDRResources on Petersham ribbons

A Challenging Sew – a useful tutorial on sewing a lined skirt with petersham.

Threads  – a Youtube tutorial on how to curve petersham to a seam.

Hopefully you have a slightly better understanding of Petersham Naomi. I have enjoyed writing up this post so thank you for asking the question.

Now lets see if you picked up something. I have 2 pictures below – which ones are the petersham ribbons? All welcome to have a go 🙂20170404_16344320170404_16381420170404_163722

Thanks for stopping by!

Hila

xoxo

PS. Apologies for poorly lit pictures. I took these on my phone today as I was writing this post.

Readers Digest Complete Guide to Sewing, First Edition 1978

The Vogue Sewing Book, Revised Metric Edition, 1978

The Sewing Book, Alison Smith, 2009

Couture Sewing Techniques, Claire B. Schaeffer, 1993

Gertie’s Ultimate Dress Book, Gretchen Hirsch, 2016

Echino Mod Mini aka Another self drafted skirt….

Hi everyone!

Allow me to present another self drafted skirt that I started on in 2015! I have a habit of starting a blog post for a project that has been cut out – that way I sort of have an idea of how long the project took to complete. Well this one has  been sitting at the bottom of my 32 drafts queue for a really long time :-). Still better late than never m’kay. The pattern is the same as this A Line skirt here but without the pockets and a tad bit shorter.

The fabric is an Echino stag cotton print that I bought a long time ago online – I believe it came from Hong Kong. I have tried to recall why it sat for so long in my UFO box but I honestly don’t know. I was sorting through things in the cave when I came across a blue carrier bag tied at the handles. It was a delight to rediscover the project which was already cut out (lining as well). It only took less than a couple of hours to sew it up and I was very pleased with the end result.blog20photos20march201720310

blog20photos20march201720316blog20photos20march201720327blog20photos20march201720328Blog Photos March2017 318It has a mod feel to it plus its super comfy because of the petersham ribbon I used on the waist. Petersham ribbon is THE best waist band finish IMO.

Anyhow, you know the drill guys, til next time…

Peace and love,

Hila

xox

SWAP2017 The Capsule Wardrobe Saga Pt 1

saga
ˈsɑːɡə/
noun

2.

a long, involved story, account, or series of incidents.
“launching into the saga of her engagement”

synonyms:

rigmarole, story, lengthy story/statement/explanation;

chain of events, catalogue of disasters;
informalspiel, palaver

On Sewing With A Plan.

I decided to start tentative work on a capsule wardrobe. After reading FabricKated’s last 2 SWAPS and My Vintage Inspirations SWAP posts, I was inspired to join in. To be honest I have considered joining in before but this is the first year I have actually understood 50% of the rules. Kate has been kind and generous enough to help me get started and has posted some insightful analysis posts to launch me into the world of sewing with a plan.

The first post was a general answer to the question on how to start a capsule wardrobe. I recommend this post as it gives a very good starting point on what is a capsule wardrobe <link here>.

I found this post very helpful and my response was:

Thank you so much for your help with this Kate. You have made clear what I have been struggling to get. Its like what you said – a lot of the stuff out there on capsule wrdrobe was either too specific or too complicated. So far my take aways from this post are :
1. I need to make everything work together which is easier than trying to meet the SWAP rule on this.
2. I like what you say about dresses reducing options so I will be sticking to one dress.
3. I do love a nice jacket and am thinking of a lightweight mac for one of my overs.
4. Colour palette – I will try my best to use stash fabric so that will most likely determine the palette I will use. Though if I didn’t have my personal rule on using stash fabric – I’d have loved Emerald green, shocking pink, red and orange.
Thank you again!

No doubt I will be coming back and rereading this as I plan. I have my sketchbook at the ready.

Kate then followed up with a development post which also looked at colour palettes for me. Again I was blown away by how her astute understanding of my aspiration style. The post is here and its a very good read if you are interested <link here>.

The key quote in the post for me was:

We need some Kondo-inspired “joy” in our collection. Notice Hila says she loves the colours I suggested – love is more motivating than “I need to use up my stash”.  Please Hila, and everyone else, come up with a plan that excites and stretches you.  Better to create five items you love, than thinking “use the stash/complete the SWAP”.  I know many SWAP participants will focus on using existing patterns and fabrics only, and it is laudable. I feel that if something is worth doing, it is worth doing well, and that means not compromising too much (when compromise might what you do all day everyday in real life).

I had been resolved to only using stashers but this tipped me over towards following my heart. So my colours were decided : Emerald green, shocking pink, red and orange, with navy and white as the neutrals.

This is a saga because I have until April 30th to finish the capsule. This is requiring a level of long-term planning I have not undertaken before. The trick for me is to think about what I want to wear next spring while I am in the groove of sewing with warm cozy knits.

To ensure that I just don’t finish a SWAP for the sake of finishing, I have added a further rule which is that I have to spend a month wearing garments I make for SWAP. I will document the month on IG and then do a post as well.

I haven’t ever thought I could do a capsule wardrobe – my initial thoughts were that it’s too restrictive. Most capsule posts I read tend to have the same stripe top-blue jeans combos which I would find boring to wear regularly. I love bright and bold colours. So I am hoping I can do something that will work for me.

Here is the formula for my SWAP ( you can read the SWAP rules here <link here>):

4 Lowers

4 Uppers plus 1 Dress (rogue)

2 Over garments

Here is what I am trying to achieve :

PicMonkey Collage

I noticed on the forum that many who are sewing SWAPs give the plan a name. After much rumination I settled on ………Be Bold, Be Bright, Be You Capsule. :-).d42183a5fbcb8a47def797dcfe7703ac

My next SWAP post will look at the patterns I have decided to go with.

Thanks for stopping by.

Peace and love,

Hila

 

Early 2017 Springwatch

Hello,

This past weekend presented itself with some lovely weather so I was out on Sunday in the garden – cleaning the greenhouse, sowing seeds, etc. The etc includes taking in the beautiful spring sights.

I don’t know about you but I love the morning after a light shower. The flowers have the droplets clinging on to their delicate petals and its a lovely thing to see. I took these pictures using OH’s phone and I was rather impressed.2017-03-12 09.47.472017-03-12 09.48.082017-03-12 09.48.51-22017-03-12 09.49.132017-03-12 09.50.012017-03-12 09.51.292017-03-12 09.53.242017-03-12 09.53.402017-03-12 09.54.102017-03-12 09.54.282017-03-12 09.55.102017-03-12 09.55.592017-03-12 09.56.152017-03-12 09.44.202017-03-12 09.44.432017-03-12 09.45.032017-03-12 09.45.072017-03-12 09.45.16

Meanwhile at the allotment the garlic and overwintering onions are doing well. I just sowed the seeds for this year. The potatoes are chitting along. This year we are only going to plant one variety of potatoes : Maris Piper.

2017-02-26 15.44.56.jpg
Leek bed
2017-02-26 15.44.23
I think it was the birds that did this to our purple sprouting brcocolli

2017-02-26 15.44.28

2017-02-26 15.44.39
The onions sets and garlic.

Spring is coming.

Big Fierce Outrageous Goals…2017….

Hello,

This was going to be my first post in 2017 but it didn’t quite work out that way. Never mind.

It’s 2017 and I decided my first post(back when I drafted it)  will be a record of my broad goals – things I want to get done that I know of, right now. Over the course of the year, this will change, of course, but it’s a good starting point.

So in 2017 – I will/shall/do/achieve/endeavour to/

  • Sew lingerie.
  • Sew 2 Burdas (from the magazine) per month.
  • Sew 6 Knipmode patterns
  • Participate in The Monthly Stitch Challenges. I think every other month will do.
  • Make men’s jeans/trousers.
  • Sew 1 item from each of my sewing books
  • Knit and finish 4 items.
  • Complete SWAP2017 before the deadline.
  • Make 1 Christmas present and a Christmas tree skirt.
  • More sewing for OH and kids.
  • Improve my lining skills.

Health wise – I love doing yoga and will continue with it but I’d like to add some cardio to that by regularly going to Zumba class. I love dancing so it fits.

Here is a video I made talking/rambling on about some of these sewing goals.